Night Flying Woman: An Ojibway Narrative (Publications of the Minnesota Historical Society)

Night Flying Woman An Ojibway Narrative Publications of the Minnesota Historical Society Librarian s Note This is an alternate cover for ISBN With the art of a practiced storyteller Ignatia Broker recounts the life of her great great grandmother Night Flying Woman who was bo

  • Title: Night Flying Woman: An Ojibway Narrative (Publications of the Minnesota Historical Society)
  • Author: Ignatia Broker
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 117
  • Format: Paperback
  • Librarian s Note This is an alternate cover for ISBN 0873511670 With the art of a practiced storyteller, Ignatia Broker recounts the life of her great great grandmother, Night Flying Woman, who was born in the mid 19th century and lived during a chaotic time of enormous change, uprootings, and loss for the Minnesota Ojibway But this story also tells of her people s greLibrarian s Note This is an alternate cover for ISBN 0873511670 With the art of a practiced storyteller, Ignatia Broker recounts the life of her great great grandmother, Night Flying Woman, who was born in the mid 19th century and lived during a chaotic time of enormous change, uprootings, and loss for the Minnesota Ojibway But this story also tells of her people s great strength and continuity This popular book is also available on audiotape read by Debra Smith An enrolled member of the Red Lake Band of Chippewa, she has performed her own poetry on a syndicated radio series on Native writers Ignatia Broker, who died in 1987, was a story teller and teacher in the Ojibway tradition In 1984 she received a Wonder Woman Foundation award honoring her as a woman striving for peace and equality Description from

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      Published :2019-08-27T02:59:05+00:00

    About "Ignatia Broker"

    1. Ignatia Broker

      Ignatia Broker Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Night Flying Woman: An Ojibway Narrative (Publications of the Minnesota Historical Society) book, this is one of the most wanted Ignatia Broker author readers around the world.

    710 thoughts on “Night Flying Woman: An Ojibway Narrative (Publications of the Minnesota Historical Society)”

    1. This book is a true story about a women who is known by many MN Ojibwe people today as Night Flyin Woman or Oona. The book recounts many important events in Night Flying Woman's life. She lived during the mid 19th century during a time of much change. Many of the changes that Night Flying Women saw in her life time were brought on by contact with the European settlers. The book really gives the reader insight into the lives of the first Native American who faced assimilation and culture shock. I [...]


    2. The overall story wasn't bad, but honestly, I can't understand why the author chose to write it in what amounts to "Tanto talk". It's not quaint, it's not charming, I think it's kind of insulting in a way because the Ojibwe DID and DO have words for things like the seasons and snow and a myriad of other things she chose to replace with things like "white on the ground". All it ends up doing is making the Indians look backwards and unintelligent, when they were just the opposite. If you really wa [...]



    3. An Ojibwa narrative about how life changed for one family when reservations were established in the late 1800s. I'm from around this area, so I have a very clear image of what life was probably like. The way of life, values, and transition to the new ways was very interesting. The writing style was very simplistic, but it lends itself to the oral tradition of storytelling. I felt like I was listening to an elder tell the story. I also liked the motif of the circle and how the ending of the story [...]



    4. (2.5) School made me read- I found myself becoming uninterested at times. But, I did learn a lot about the Ojibway culture




    5. TW: Death, violence.This novel catalogues the life of the author’s great-great grandmother, Oona, an Ojibwe woman. Living in Minnesota, Oona, or Night Flying Woman, experiences the arrival of Europeans, eventually being forced to resettle in the White Earth Reservation. Although Oona and her people are instructed not to continue their cultural customs, Oona, not wanting her culture to be lost, secretly teachers her children about their culture and heritage. Because of the importance of indigen [...]


    6. I fortunately picked up this book at Oceti Sakowin Camp in Standing Rock. This Ojibway great grandmother's narrative of colonization as it happened to her family, step by step is both infuriating, but also beautiful in the way that she never let go of her power in knowing and respecting the old ways. It's very gently told but I couldn't help but quake with anger at the horrible things white people forced Native people to do like send their kids from the forest to boarding school, or renounce the [...]


    7. Broker's sparse prose conveys profound beauty, grief, joy and sorrow in this simple narrative of Ojibwe life during an era of tremendous change for Minnesota's American Indian peoples (approximately 1865 - 1945). The story of Oona, Broker's great great grandmother, reminds one of the powerful relationship between people and place. Like the native plants and animals of a region, people "grow" out of the soil that sustains them, and their "bones are mixed with this earth," forever connected with a [...]


    8. This is the fictionalized story of three generations of Ojibway women, covering the time from before the coming of "the strangers" to the mid-20th century. Based on stories told to her by her family, the author explores the way that the Ojibway people lived, assimilated, and adapted to the changes they experienced.In simple language, Broker recreates the past and explores the connections to the present and the future. This isn't really a narrative per se, but more of an evocation of times long p [...]


    9. This is a story about Brokers great-great grandmother, Ni-Bo-wi-se-gwe or Night Flying Woman. She was born in the mid nineteenth century and lived through a very chaotic time for the Minnesota Ojibway people. This is a story about how ancient ways were drastically altered when cultures came in contact, but, it is also a story of the great strength and continuity of the Ojibway people; their belief in the circle of life, in sharing the harvest, the belief that their animal brothers give something [...]


    10. I give this four stars for value and for what it could contribute to the growth of a new, more whole culture. It's so hopeful to hear the stories of how humans lived in a supportive, sustainable balance in the wilderness. It's wonderful to hear about the giving culture of sharing and help among the community. This book is no page-turner or literary highlight, but what it communicates is so important. Our Western story of human life as inevitably "nasty, brutish, and short" is incomplete, and thi [...]


    11. If you want to know some Ojibwe history, or have some native understanding of the transition from freedom to life on the reservation, I definitely recommend this book. It's a narrative, a record and remembrance, of one woman's childhood in the forest to her grey years surrounded by the "new ways." It's not nearly as bitter as you might expect given the circumstances.This book also comes highly recommended by Louise Erdrich, one of my favorites, so if you like her work, you'll get a lot out of Ni [...]


    12. I enjoyed reading this book, but it was fairly short and I don't feel like I learned as much as I expected I would from it. It was interesting to learn about the culture clash between the Ojibway and the white people, but once things grasped my attention, the book transitioned to a different topic or ended.


    13. THIS ONE WAS KIND OF A HARD READ, NGL. IT DIDN'T RLY HAVE MUCH OF A NARRATIVE, AND JFC, THE PROSE GOT ANNOYING AFTER A WHILE, BECAUSE IT RLY DID SOUND LIKE TANTO TALKING. IT WAS OKAY, BUT I PROBABLY WON'T REREAD IT.


    14. A light and easy read. A romanticized and glossed over look at the life of the Ojibwe before and after European settlers arrived in America. Not my cup of tea, I would have preferred to read either the myths or legends of the Ojibwe, or a more in depth accounting. 1/18/09


    15. Premonitions, Visions, Shawomanism. An incite to to the connectedness of earth and one's thoughts. Hoe one one women through her visons help her village.




    16. I received this book as a gift a few years ago and just reread it. Such a wonderful book. It puts life back in balance, a great read when you are feeling unsure about your place in this world.


    17. Recommended to me by an Ojibway friend, who knew the author. A beautifully written narrative which offers a deeply moving account of a Native people's lifeways.



    18. I believe that I appreciated the concept of this book more than I enjoyed the actual reading of it. It gets off to a slow start, but becomes more powerful as it moves toward modern day.


    19. This was my introduction to the Ojibway. Thank you for converting these beautiful oral tales to paper before they were lost.


    20. There are so many things about culture that bind us not only to our past, but to what we know to be good and true about ourselves and what we hope will continue in our posterity.



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